Daily Archives: July 11, 2016

CellSafety Blog Pet Products Sleep Accessories

Plush Pet Pad

Published by:

pet pad2The Cotton Pet Pad is a 50 cm (20″) by 75 cm (30″) cotton conductive pad that can be used to line your pets favourite bed or as a pet bed in itself. Easy to wash and maintain, just like all earthing sheets/throws, Just follow the simple care instructions and your pet will enjoy years of Earthing benefits, even in high rise apartments.

Of course the Pet Pad (aka Plush Pad) is also ideal for humans too; on a chair to sit on, behind your back, draped over your lap, or to lay on in bed.

pet pad3Just remember that only one side of the plush pad is conductive and not the other. Make sure you have the side of the Pet Pad that shows the parallel rows of silver fibre stitching closest to your skin (or fur!)

logo

Save

 

CellSafety Blog Earthing

Earthing Plant Experiment For Kids

Published by:

logo2This a simple and fun experiment to do with your kids (mine loved it) to demonstrate how “Earthing”‘ a sunflower or plant will increase it’s vitality and longevity by giving it access to the abundant supply of electrons from the Earth. Once plants and flowers have been potted or cut, they have been removed from the “electric nutrition” that they naturally have when growing in the ground outside. Some people call this electric nutrition “vitamin G,” G standing for ground. So this simple science experiment proves that plants removed from the ground do better when you give them vitamin G by reconnecting them to the Earth.
When your kids see the positive benefits for plants, they also better understand why grounding is important for human health.
How to Do an Experiment Comparing Grounded vs. Non-Grounded Plants
The Earthing plant experiment can be done easily with cut flowers, such as sunflowers. Usually within ten days, you can observe the difference in vitality and life between grounded and non-grounded plants.
You can also experiment with potted plants; however, it will take much longer to see the effects of growth differences between grounded and non-grounded plants indoors.
Examples of how grounded vs. non-grounded flowers may look:

What You Will Need
• 1 or more cut flowers, such as sunflowers.
• 2 or more similar vases, depending on how many flowers you will be experimenting with. Examples: 2 vases for 1 grounded flower and 1 non-grounded flower, 4 vases for 2 grounded flowers and 2 non-grounded flowers.
• 1 or more Earthing Plant Experiment Kit (each containing a power outlet tester to check the wall outlet is grounded correctly, a 10-foot Earthing cord attached to a 10-inch stainless steel ground rod and an Australian Adapter Plug)
• Digital camera to record changes.
Procedure
1. Obtain cut sunflowers.
2. Set up 2 or more vases. Fill halfway with water.
3. Place vases in same area with similar lighting and no direct sun, and with access to a grounded/earthed electrical wall outlet.
4. Check your wall outlet first for proper grounding using provided power outlet tester
5. Insert male end of Earthing cord into the port of the adapter plug and plug into the wall outlet. Place the other end with grounding rod into vase or planter of flowers to be grounded.
6. For non-grounded flowers, simply place each in its own vase half-filled with tap water
7. Take picture of group of flowers on a daily basis. Note changes in grounded vs. non-grounded flowers on each day after changes become apparent.

Earthing Plant Experiment For Kids
This a simple and fun experiment to do with your kids (mine loved it) to demonstrate how “Earthing”‘ a sunflower or plant will increase it’s vitality and longevity by giving it access to the abundant supply of electrons from the Earth. Once plants and flowers have been potted or cut, they have been removed from the “electric nutrition” that they naturally have when growing in the ground outside. Some people call this electric nutrition “vitamin G,” G standing for ground. So this simple science experiment proves that plants removed from the ground do better when you give them vitamin G by reconnecting them to the Earth.
When your kids see the positive benefits for plants, they also better understand why grounding is important for human health.
How to Do an Experiment Comparing Grounded vs. Non-Grounded Plants
The Earthing plant experiment can be done easily with cut flowers, such as sunflowers. Usually within ten days, you can observe the difference in vitality and life between grounded and non-grounded plants.
You can also experiment with potted plants; however, it will take much longer to see the effects of growth differences between grounded and non-grounded plants indoors.
Examples of how grounded vs. non-grounded flowers may look:

What You Will Need
• 1 or more cut flowers, such as sunflowers.
• 2 or more similar vases, depending on how many flowers you will be experimenting with. Examples: 2 vases for 1 grounded flower and 1 non-grounded flower, 4 vases for 2 grounded flowers and 2 non-grounded flowers.
• 1 or more Earthing Plant Experiment Kit (each containing a power outlet tester to check the wall outlet is grounded correctly, a 10-foot Earthing cord attached to a 10-inch stainless steel ground rod and an Australian Adapter Plug)
• Digital camera to record changes.
Procedure
1. Obtain cut sunflowers.
2. Set up 2 or more vases. Fill halfway with water.
3. Place vases in same area with similar lighting and no direct sun, and with access to a grounded/earthed electrical wall outlet.
4. Check your wall outlet first for proper grounding using provided power outlet tester
5. Insert male end of Earthing cord into the port of the adapter plug and plug into the wall outlet. Place the other end with grounding rod into vase or planter of flowers to be grounded.
6. For non-grounded flowers, simply place each in its own vase half-filled with tap water
7. Take picture of group of flowers on a daily basis. Note changes in grounded vs. non-grounded flowers on each day after changes become apparent.

logo

 

Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Google PlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeVisit Us On LinkedinCheck Our Feed